E36M3 #1436

Friday, June 29, 2001 13:54:44

This digest contains the following messages:

#1. Re: Crank Position Sensor Problems/Questions - from Ron Buchalski
#2. Re: [E36M3] Re: Fw: Summit Point Wreck - from peter@guagenti.com
#3. BMW bump stops - from TFRM3@aol.com
#4. crankshaft position sensor - from Scott Yu
#5. Re: Car Control Schools/Autocrossing - from Ron Buchalski
#6. Re: [E36M3] Anyone have a warped clutch pedal? - from Chris Papademetrious
#7. Re:Summit Wreck Update - from Vince Throckmorton
#8. Re: [E36M3] Re: Car Control Schools/Autocrossing - from Todd C. Merrill
#9. [Fwd: HID kit on it's way] - from Sue Kraft
#10. Re: M3 Totalled at Summit - from Neil Maller

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#1. Re: Crank Position Sensor Problems/Questions - from Ron Buchalski
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 15:28:19 From: "Ron Buchalski" <rbuchals@hotmail.com> Subject: Re: Crank Position Sensor Problems/Questions Joel, I have a '95 M3, so I didn't have this problem. But, from what I recall reading on this topic, others have said that replacement crank position sensors could also fail. It sounds like you had a crank position sensor replaced, but perhaps it was prior to BMW's sensor re-design. Since it was a recalled item, the dealer should replace it with the new sensor and harness, at no charge to you. -rb >Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 02:09:48 -0400 >From: jbossard@pop.erols.com >Subject: Crank Position Sensor Problems/Questions > >Dear Folks: > I've recently had a driveability problem with my 1998 M3/4 (42k), and now >have some questions about the crank sensor. > The car started having an intermittent problem where it would loose all >power for about 1 second, and soon thereafter drop into "3-cylinder mode", >running at greatly reduced power. Not fun in traffic. 3-5 times a day, or >not for 2 days, randomly. > Research in the archives of this and other digests pointed towards the O2 >sensors, and I replaced the front 2 sensors (there's a total of 4). Not a >bad job, but it didn't help. So I purchased a Peake Research code reader, >and it shows: crank position sensor failure, cyl 4-6 O2 sensor out of >range, and cyl 4-6 failure(or similar). Looks like the crank sensor, which >could lead to the other 2 errors. Odd, I thought, because 2 yrs ago, my >car had the O2 sensor Service Bulletin performed. <snip> _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com

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#2. Re: [E36M3] Re: Fw: Summit Point Wreck - from peter@guagenti.com
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 08:41:36 US/Pacific From: peter@guagenti.com Subject: Re: [E36M3] Re: Fw: Summit Point Wreck > I still believe that the national BMWCCA organization (or the individual > chapters, if the National organization is unwilling) should develop a series > of CAR CONTROL schools that don't require a racetrack. They would be events > where students could learn and practice car control skills. As others have said, I feel like this is best learned in autocross. Even there you dont get a whole lot of seat time, but you push your car _way_ harder than you do in the average track session, have to drive through courses that are much more technical than you would ever see on a track, and if you spin or lose it you only hurt your ego. I autocrossed for about a year and half before ever getting on the track (as a driver), and I wouldnt have had it any other way. There was no need to pour over details like what is an apex, what happens if you turn in early, how to keep the car from understeer/oversteer, etc. I simply needed to listen to the instructor, learn the line, and get smooth in my inputs (something autocross does _not_ promote ;-) The best thing Ive done for myself in learning car control was to take an Evolution Autocross school. Rather than trying to focus on the technical aspects of racing, they set-up a very complicated and technical course and teach you two things: how to look ahead (and where to look) and how to "feel" what the car is doing and correct for it. The trick to always be looking one-two turns ahead of the one you're in smooths out your line amazingly, and by focusing on what your car is doing rather than specifically on braking and turn-in points, you become more connected to your car. Definitely something worth checking out, whether you're a road racer or a weekend cone-mangler. -p ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message was sent using HiSpeed Technologies Webmail. http://www.hispeed.com

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#3. BMW bump stops - from TFRM3@aol.com
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 11:49:32 EDT From: TFRM3@aol.com Subject: BMW bump stops Some one commented: " I haven't seen the stock BMW bumpstops in person compared to the ones H&R advocates. Any thoughts?" I comment: BMW bumpstops, since the 320i, have consistently been the best in the business. Period. I have seen and tested every bumpstop imaginable, and the BMW pieces are excellent. All the ride and handling and cracked strut tower problems you read about here or on bimmer.org/alex or wherever are on cars that no longer use the stock bumpstop. Search the archives, it's the truth. Jay Morris, owner of thousands of German made bumpstops that say "GC" on them. (also owner of an e46 M3 that opens the sunroof when you slide the vanity mirror cover. I wonder if the website donotbuyabmwbecausethesunroofopensupwhenyoutrytopopazit.com is taken)

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#4. crankshaft position sensor - from Scott Yu
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 08:48:17 -0700 From: "Scott Yu" <scott@ditherdog.com> Subject: crankshaft position sensor One more point of reference - my '97 was WAAY out of warranty (odo @~70Kmi) when BMW contacted me and told me about the TSB. They told me it would be serviced for free at any dealer - I got it done at Chambers in Boston. best, Scott > Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 02:09:48 -0400 > From: jbossard@pop.erols.com > Subject: Crank Position Sensor Problems/Questions > So my questions are: > 1. Do I have the right parts? crank sensor 12-14-1-709-616, harness > 12-51-4-592-703 > 2. Did my previous dealer burn me on the SB update? I know, dumb question. > 3. How do I hook this thing up? > 4. Can anyone provide me with a copy of the crank sensor SB? > 5. Can any of this be covered under the 100k emmissions warranty? runs like > crud in 3-cylinder mode. This assumes I can bring myself to take it to the > dealer.

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#5. Re: Car Control Schools/Autocrossing - from Ron Buchalski
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 15:53:34 From: "Ron Buchalski" <rbuchals@hotmail.com> Subject: Re: Car Control Schools/Autocrossing >Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 09:53:41 -0400 >From: Steve Hazard <SHazard@nhboston.com> >Subject: Car Control Schools/Autocrossing > > > >Ron I agree with you and others regarding the need for more Car Control >Schools.... > >But I have to disagree with your opinion regarding an Autocross run being >"to short" to learn the proper skills. <snip> Steve, Thanks for the post. You made some excellent points, and the real life experiences enlightened me on the value of autocross to improve one's car control skills. I agree that a full year of autocross will definitely help someone to learn car control skills, but most people can't devote 2-3 weeks/month for an entire season to get that much seat time. If someone autocrosses 4 times per year, the total time for all autocross runs would equal (4 days x 4 runs x 1.5 minutes/run) = 24 minutes per year One or two days of a car control school can provide a more focused learning experience (through repetition), and would provide several HOURS of training. -rb _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com

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#6. Re: [E36M3] Anyone have a warped clutch pedal? - from Chris Papademetrious
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 12:16:03 -0400 From: Chris Papademetrious <chrispitude@yahoo.com> Subject: Re: [E36M3] Anyone have a warped clutch pedal? At 09:49 AM 6/29/2001 -0500, Dan Miley wrote: >Do any of your cars have this syndrome? The clutch pedal is offset >a bit to the left and up from where it should be. It seems to work >all right, although it's a bit squeaky. I'll probably get a new pedal from >Ron Stygar, but would prefer to keep the car stock until the warranty >runs out. Dan, you know, I was just about to sit down and write the same message, to see if anyone else had this problem. My pedal tilts off to the left as well, and is squeaky, and actually misses the clutch stop now. I certainly think that this fact alone means it's not correct. How does your pedal line up relative to the clutch stop? I'll have to check out the fixes that Chester mentions. - Chris

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#7. Re:Summit Wreck Update - from Vince Throckmorton
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 12:36:10 -0500 From: Vince Throckmorton <vince@rjthrockmorton.com> Subject: Re:Summit Wreck Update I'm 40 years old and have raced for 32 years of my life from AMA Motorcycles, Hill climb, Flat track, Motocross, Hare Scrambles to SCCA, 12 classes and NASCAR asphalt Modifieds and Late Models. I've been an instructor for BMWCCA, PCA and SCCA since 92. I have empathy for John's misfortune as I wadded up a GT Mustang badly at my first BMW driving school back in 1988. I know that behind the scenes many club members and attendees were poking fun at my mishap, but several of the instuctors including my own, whom had signed me off after only my 2nd run, gave me some great advice, namely to learn from this mistake. It appears that John has learned as I did, a very expensive lesson. I agree with most of the comments I've read about car control and while I've never autocrossed I agree that it sure must improve a drivers skill level. I will offer this advice to anyone that tracks their car, never believe that accidents on a race track can not happen to you. At the limits that many of us are driving and the years of experience we may have, chit happens, and that's why they call them accidents. My advice for everyone that enjoys tracking their M3's, do a Skip Barber or similar school in a club ford and then rent somthing for an SCCA school that's really slow like a spec racer or IT car, then do a race or two. I'm sure it will improve your lap times in your M3 a bunch and most will have been bitten by the bug to race for real. There is nothing as fun as using the chrome horn to get a guy out of your way on the track. Vince Throckmorton 98 M3-4

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#8. Re: [E36M3] Re: Car Control Schools/Autocrossing - from Todd C. Merrill
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 14:08:54 -0400 (EDT) From: "Todd C. Merrill" <tmerrill@mathworks.com> Subject: Re: [E36M3] Re: Car Control Schools/Autocrossing On Fri, 29 Jun 2001, Ron Buchalski wrote: > entire season to get that much seat time. If someone autocrosses 4 times > per year, the total time for all autocross runs would equal (4 days x 4 runs > x 1.5 minutes/run) = 24 minutes per year > > One or two days of a car control school can provide a more focused learning > experience (through repetition), and would provide several HOURS of > training. I'm finding that the shorter seat times, but the periodic reinforcement of driving skills at autocrosses, to be more valuable, to me, than a "one-time" car control event. Like fine cutlery, keeping my skills periodically honed with autocrosses hopefully makes me a better driver overall. But, skid pads sure are a blast. Until next time... Todd tm-m3@mathworks.com 1998 BMW M3 coupe BMW CCA member, Boston Chapter ---

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#9. [Fwd: HID kit on it's way] - from Sue Kraft
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 13:20:54 -0500 From: Sue Kraft <skraft1@new.rr.com> Subject: [Fwd: HID kit on it's way] -------- Original Message -------- Subject: HID kit on it's way Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 10:20:19 -0700 From: "Jim Powell" <jsp98m3@apexcone.com> To: "'Triode Girl'" <skraft1@new.rr.com> I haven't done the writeup but if you want to pass on any news, the HID kit is on order, I should have it here in a day or two. But the best news is that the price floor has been $600 plus tax and/or shipping depending on instate/mailorder pricing. I have found a new low margin source for the Philips kit that sells the kit for $479.50 :) Tell people to watch http://www.apexcone.com it'll be on the web an hour after I get the kit.

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#10. Re: M3 Totalled at Summit - from Neil Maller
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Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 13:47:37 -0500 From: Neil Maller <neil.maller@gte.net> Subject: Re: M3 Totalled at Summit Some thoughts engendered by the Summit Point incident and various posts on the subject: - There have been several comments mentioning proper safety equipment for 10/10ths driving. Does anyone here think that intentionally driving 10/10ths at a driving school is a good idea? Ever? If so I have just two words for you: Club Racing. (BTW, I define 10/10ths in a relative way: the combination of a given driver and car. Your 6/10ths might be faster in absolute terms than my 9/10ths.) - Having a dedicated track car is no doubt a fine idea, especially if you have the necessary financial (first cost/maintenance/alternative daily driver/etc.) and logistical (storage/trailer?) flexibility. But it also takes away some of the objectives of the school: to learn how to drive your street car at higher limits than otherwise practical or legally possible, and so become a safer and more skilful driver. - Using a roll bar with 4/5 point harness (and of course helmet) will undoubtedly increase passive safety for track use. It will also render your rear seat unusable for passenger occupancy the rest of the time. On the street the bar, when used without helmet and harness, may also compromise front seat safety unacceptably. This will be worse for tall drivers, whose seat position can put their unprotected head close to the bar, but may not be much of an issue at all for short drivers. It'll tend to be better for coupés, but worse for sedans, due to the respective B pillar positions. - The argument is sometimes advanced that a 4 (or 5) point harness should not be used without a roll bar or cage, since in case of a rollover with severe roof collapse (a la Sears Point) the occupants may be held upright and suffer serious spinal injuries. In 5 years I've never seen or heard of any such occurrence at a school, although the possibility warrants discussion. A couple of club chapters now mandate using only the stock lap/diagonal belts if there's no rollover protection. However it's also absolutely certain that a 4 point harness offers superior protection in any other accident mode than total roof collapse. What's the probability of a rollover with severe roof collapse vs. that of all other accident modes combined? Where is the line of compromise drawn, and who should make that decision? - With regard to rollovers, there may be some regional variations at play. The tracks I've driven on here in the Midwest are: Gingerman Grattan Indianapolis Raceway Park Mid Ohio Michigan International Speedway Putnam Park Road America Of these only MIS and RA even generate 5th gear speeds in an M3, and at MIS the higher speeds are out on the NASCAR bowl, which is wide and predictable (well, it is if you're not drafting nose-to-tail in the pack at 180 mph, anyway!). Obviously I'm assuming that rollovers severe enough to collapse the roof totally tend to require the energy of higher speeds. Are the conditions and the risk trade-offs different at Summit Point, Road Atlanta, Laguna Seca and others, with their higher speed corners? Maybe so. My point in all this is that running a street car at a race track is a safety compromise from the very start. There are few absolute answers, and every participant needs to make his or her own informed and well-considered decisions about safety. Having said which, maybe I'll see some of you at Motor City's school at MIS the weekend after July 4th. Drive safely. Neil 96 M3

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