E36M3 #1384

Thursday, June 14, 2001 19:23:54

This digest contains the following messages:

#1. BMW Parts/Repair CD vs. Bentley Manual - from Scott Chan
#2. More Power! - from peter@guagenti.com
#3. Re: [E36M3] More Power! - from Steven Tom
#4. Re: Putting on exhaust - from Neil Maller
#5. stock 95 M3 suspension for sale - from Todd Ogi
#6. Re: O2 Sensor Replacement - from Ron Katona
#7. Re: [E36M3] Bilstein Bump Stop Trimming - from Jeremy Lucas
#8. Lighting upgrades survey - from Seth Frader-Thompson
#9. RE: [E36M3] Re: O2 Sensor Replacement - from Mel Silva
#10. RE: [E36M3] Bilstein Bump Stop Trimming => Warantee??? - from Tom Tice

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#1. BMW Parts/Repair CD vs. Bentley Manual - from Scott Chan
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 09:26:50 -0700 From: Scott Chan <scottch@juniper.net> Subject: BMW Parts/Repair CD vs. Bentley Manual Call me old-fashioned, but paper just seems to work better in typical repair situations. When you are crawling under the engine bay cursing at some balky fastener, it just doesn't seem right to get grease all over your laptop computer. CDs work fine if you are pre-planning some installation project, like building or installing an engine. Then you can take the time to print out the procedure, read it, and then head to the garage and get grease on the printout.

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#2. More Power! - from peter@guagenti.com
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 09:49:30 US/Pacific From: peter@guagenti.com Subject: More Power! Fellow Listers... Ever in a search for more power, I have a few questions that I was hoping for answers to. What is the potential performance increase of a ported and polished cylinder head? Bekkers sells what they call a "High Performance Cylinder Head" for the E36 that is ported and polished, with higher tension valve springs, titanium retainers, and performance cams, and a new ratio of 10:8:1. It's pretty spendy at a price of about $3k, but if the performance gains are strong, it seems to be an interesting alternative to forced induction. While the increases are surely lower, you get a refreshed engine and a safer route than a blower. On a similar note, are there cams available for OBDII engines that will not kick on the check engine or make you fail emissions? I keep reading the euro mags and seeing companies like Kellener and Racing Dynamics getting fairly strong improvements on the 2.8l and 3.2l engines with mild cams. Are we SOL for getting these in the states? I've ben considering the supercharger route to bring the power up on my wife's 328, but I'm concerned about reliability. The engine has 80k on it, and has had cooling problems in the past. If I do go this route, are there things I should consider doing to the engine prior so as to ensure a lower chance of mishaps? The car is having the entire cooling system replaced right now due to a cracked radiator neck (that makes component #3 of a three component system to fail on this car), and I'm assuming that's the most important. What else? The last question, after the usual intake, chip, and exhaust, what's next? We've had this dicussion before (over a year ago) but I'm wondering if there's any new insight. I've heard the schrick intake manifold and headers are a waste of time, but has anyone actually dyno'd these things? Any advice/insight/dialogue is appreciated. -peterg ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This message was sent using HiSpeed Technologies Webmail. http://www.hispeed.com

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#3. Re: [E36M3] More Power! - from Steven Tom
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 09:58:47 -0700 From: Steven Tom <stom@qualcomm.com> Subject: Re: [E36M3] More Power! Something bouncing around the boards is to remove the ASC throttle body to provide a cleaner flow to the engine. The advantage is that you never have to hit the ASC button in your car anymore because it defaults off. The disadvantage is that you no longer have ASC. Has anyone dynoed this configuration? steve At 11:53 AM 6/14/01 -0500, peter@guagenti.com wrote: >Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 09:49:30 US/Pacific >From: peter@guagenti.com >Subject: More Power! > >Fellow Listers... > >Ever in a search for more power, I have a few questions that I was hoping >for answers to. > >What is the potential performance increase of a ported and polished >cylinder head? Bekkers sells what they call a "High Performance Cylinder >Head" for the E36 that is ported and polished, with higher tension valve >springs, titanium retainers, and performance cams, and a new ratio of >10:8:1. It's pretty spendy at a price of about $3k, but if the performance >gains are strong, it seems to be an interesting alternative to forced >induction. While the increases are surely lower, you get a refreshed >engine and a safer route than a blower. > >On a similar note, are there cams available for OBDII engines that will not >kick on the check engine or make you fail emissions? I keep reading the >euro mags and seeing companies like Kellener and Racing Dynamics >getting fairly strong improvements on the 2.8l and 3.2l engines with mild >cams. Are we SOL for getting these in the states? > >I've ben considering the supercharger route to bring the power up on my >wife's 328, but I'm concerned about reliability. The engine has 80k on it, >and has had cooling problems in the past. If I do go this route, are there >things I should consider doing to the engine prior so as to ensure a lower >chance of mishaps? The car is having the entire cooling system replaced >right now due to a cracked radiator neck (that makes component #3 of a >three component system to fail on this car), and I'm assuming that's the >most important. What else? > >The last question, after the usual intake, chip, and exhaust, what's next? >We've had this dicussion before (over a year ago) but I'm wondering if >there's any new insight. I've heard the schrick intake manifold and >headers are a waste of time, but has anyone actually dyno'd these things? > >Any advice/insight/dialogue is appreciated. > >-peterg > >------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- >This message was sent using HiSpeed Technologies Webmail. >http://www.hispeed.com > > > >************************************************************* >List Commands >UNSUBSCRIBE - (in subject line) unsubscribes you from the mailing list. >DIR - sends a listing of files available in the list's GET directory. >GET filename1.ext,filename2.ext - sends the requested file(s). > >To issue a command/request to the server: >Send a message with the command you wish executed as the >subject of the message. >************************************************************* >

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#4. Re: Putting on exhaust - from Neil Maller
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 13:29:19 -0500 From: Neil Maller <neil.maller@gte.net> Subject: Re: Putting on exhaust on 6/14/01 11:32 AM, Tony <m3lawdawg@yahoo.com> wrote: > I just purchased a UUC exhaust, are there any exhaust > gaskets that I need to get before putting it on and > should I replace any of the hangers while Iam there. I just replaced a broken rear rubber hanger on my 96 M3 at 61K miles. A friend just installed a used M3 exhaust on his 93 325i at 90K miles. In both cases the rear hanger bracket hardware was so rusted and heat baked that bolts sheared on removal. However we're in the Midwest, with road salt and nasty winters. A California car, say, might not have the same issues. Here are the parts I used, with mail order prices from The BMW Store: Rubber rear exhaust hanger Qty 2 P/N 18 20 1 401 797 $31.60 ea Exhaust mounting kit 1 18 21 9 059 408 $27.60 ea Rubber front exhaust hanger 2 18 30 1 703 634 $ 4.40 ea The mounting kit has everything *except* the rubber hangers, and includes replacement sealing rings for where the exhaust mates to the cat pipes, the special copper nuts, new brackets, bolts etc. As you can see, that's around $100 of parts once you extend the quantities, not cheap. Then again your car is now 6 years old and might need them. Neil 96 M3

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#5. stock 95 M3 suspension for sale - from Todd Ogi
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 12:37:06 -0700 From: Todd Ogi <TOgi@etimecapital.com> Subject: stock 95 M3 suspension for sale All, I have the stock struts/springs/shocks from a 10/95 build date M3 with about 40K miles on them for sale. I'd even throw in the stock swaybars (minus the front links) if you wanted, the only stipulation is that you have to come and pick them up in Menlo Park (bay area). If you are interested, make an offer, thanks. T

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#6. Re: O2 Sensor Replacement - from Ron Katona
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 16:02:23 -0400 From: "Ron Katona" <rkatona@bellatlantic.net> Subject: Re: O2 Sensor Replacement Thanks for all the replies... this job is so easy I almost feel like a maroon for even asking. OK, I did have access to a lift and a crow's foot O2 sensor wrench which made the job a snap. Check engine light went out after the third cycle and all is well. I noticed a 50% increase in fuel milage, two seconds off 0-60, and whiter teeth since installation <g>. -- Ron Katona

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#7. Re: [E36M3] Bilstein Bump Stop Trimming - from Jeremy Lucas
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 18:20:32 -0400 From: "Jeremy Lucas" <jlucas@columbus.rr.com> Subject: Re: [E36M3] Bilstein Bump Stop Trimming ----- Original Message ----- From: "Chester Wong" <chester_p_wong@yahoo.com> > > I still don't see a basis for any discussion at all considering it's more or > less proven that the Bilsteins are not correctly designed for the M3s where the > bump stops are too long. That compounded with the shorter springs means that > at static, you're resting on the bump stops. The bump stops should be trimmed > without even a question...especially since a fellow lister did some research > and discovered that doing so does not violate any warranty. I don't mean to step on anybody's toes but I really don't see why everyone is saying that Bilsteins "are not correctly designed for the M3". I talked with the Bilstein guy about this too, it's more of an issue of tuning preference. He said in sporting applications like the M3, and other original equipment supplied parts that they have to auto makers, 20mm from stock ride height is the normal engagement point for the bump stops. You have to remember that bump "stops" don't really become stops until you compress them about 50% (depending on the stiffness of the stop), so at any point before that they are providing the effect of additional spring stiffness. Jeremy Lucas Delaware, OH

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#8. Lighting upgrades survey - from Seth Frader-Thompson
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 16:51:37 -0600 From: "Seth Frader-Thompson" <fraderth@colorado.edu> Subject: Lighting upgrades survey Seems like a lot of people have done it recently, so a question for all of you who've upgraded your headlights: what did you do (HIDs, ellipsoids, etc.), and how do you like the results? Would you do the same again? I just got back from Europe, where my girlfriend and I rented a Golf TDI. Very fun little car, and definitely the best rental car I've ever had, but also my first experience with euro-spec headlights. The lights on the Golf just weren't that good, and it seemed like the sharp cutoff really limited visibility around left turns. Seems like my money would perhaps better be spent on an HID conversion if the BMW ellipsoids are similar to the VW units. Thanks, Seth (really frustrated with the lights in just about every car I've driven)

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#9. RE: [E36M3] Re: O2 Sensor Replacement - from Mel Silva
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 19:17:45 -0500 From: "Mel Silva" <mel.silva@pdq.net> Subject: RE: [E36M3] Re: O2 Sensor Replacement I don't need to do this today, but... Anyway, does this job need to be done with a crows foot wrench? I did this job many times on my other car (changed exhaust systems a lot) and I used a BF 21mm combination wrench. The box end could be fit over the connector to loosen the beast and then the open end could be used to remove. These were Bosch units. What size crows foot do you need to do this? Need more tools (note to Jay: Notice I didn't say more "tool") Bwaaaa Haaaa Haaaa Mel -----Original Message----- From: Ron Katona [mailto:rkatona@bellatlantic.net] Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2001 3:03 PM To: E36M3 Subject: [E36M3] Re: O2 Sensor Replacement Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 16:02:23 -0400 From: "Ron Katona" <rkatona@bellatlantic.net> Subject: Re: O2 Sensor Replacement Thanks for all the replies... this job is so easy I almost feel like a maroon for even asking. OK, I did have access to a lift and a crow's foot O2 sensor wrench which made the job a snap. Check engine light went out after the third cycle and all is well. I noticed a 50% increase in fuel milage, two seconds off 0-60, and whiter teeth since installation <g>. -- Ron Katona ************************************************************* List Commands UNSUBSCRIBE - (in subject line) unsubscribes you from the mailing list. DIR - sends a listing of files available in the list's GET directory. GET filename1.ext,filename2.ext - sends the requested file(s). To issue a command/request to the server: Send a message with the command you wish executed as the subject of the message. *************************************************************

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#10. RE: [E36M3] Bilstein Bump Stop Trimming => Warantee??? - from Tom Tice
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Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 20:23:05 -0400 From: "Tom Tice" <tetice@triad.rr.com> Subject: RE: [E36M3] Bilstein Bump Stop Trimming => Warantee??? Not so fast on that warrantee issue. Jeremy was kind enough to share with me the number of the guy at Bilstein that he talked to regarding the trimming of the bumpstops. After pushing him a bit further on this issue he is doing some serious backpedaling (my perception). He says now that H&R recommends the trimming of the bumpstops (implying that it is not Bilstein's recommendation). When specifically asked about the warrantee, he first indicated that this would have no effect but that the warrantee doesn't cover any racing or "motorsport related" use. He also indicated that trimming the bumpstop will increase the chances of the shock being damaged in some form or fashion and the warrantee doesn't cover damage (i.e. due to a pothole, rough ride off the track, etc.). Finally, he admitted that any warrantee decision would not be up to him anyway and that I should contact one of their sales representatives. I tried both east and west coast sales guys today but never got hold of either one. So unless one of these guys is willing to put something in writing, Bilstein certainly had the ability to weasel out of any warrantee claim. I'll let the group know if I find out anything different. As for riding on the untrimmed bumpstops, while I haven't opened mine up yet those that I have experience with on other Bilsteins consist of a compressible foam. So riding on the initial portion of the bumpstop is not like having a solid suspension, only one with a different (i.e. stiffer) spring rate. Obviously if you compress the bumpstop far enough it will reach a point where it will compress no further but that should be (my guess) and inch or better in travel. If you have the H&R race springs you may well have the suspension effectively bottomed out but I wouldn't really know until I see how the bumpstops are actually constructed. Tom Tice '98 M3/4 '99 540/6 That compounded with the shorter > springs means that > at static, you're resting on the bump stops. The bump stops > should be trimmed > without even a question...especially since a fellow lister did > some research > and discovered that doing so does not violate any warranty. > > Harsh or no harsh, riding around on untrimmed bilsteins just doesn't make > sense. You might as well remove your strut and springs and insert a hard > rubber solid bushing. > > Chester > > --- Matt Henson <hensonator@yahoo.com> wrote: > > Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 06:56:55 -0700 (PDT) > > From: Matt Henson <hensonator@yahoo.com> > > Subject: Re: [E36M3] Bilstein Bump Stop Trimming > > > > Maybe it depends on the car or something but I've had > > the Bilts. and H&R Sport combo both with and w/o the > > trimmed stops. The difference was night and day. > > Bfore the stops were trimmed the car had almost no > > suspension compression travel at all. I would expect > > that a car with springs that aren't as low as the H&R > > sports may not benefit from the trimming as much. > > -Matt > > > > > > --- John Bergstrom <john0990@yahoo.com> wrote: > > > Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 06:38:42 -0700 (PDT) > > > From: John Bergstrom <john0990@yahoo.com> > > > Subject: Bilstein Bump Stop Trimming > > > > > > Having driven both non-trimmed Bilstein setups and > > > trimmed Bilstein setups, I > > > still assert that I have felt almost NO difference > > > between the two. The > > > trimmed setup MIGHT have been a little less bouncy, > > > but no less harsh. > > > > > > Just my $0.02. >

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